Friday, 17 January 2014

The world's hacks now think that UK press is less free - they may be right



The world's hacks now think that UK press is less free - they may be right

Just this week Polis hosted a group of journalists from newsrooms and regulation bodies in countries as diverse as Norway, Uruguay, America and Pakistan. UK experts in favour of strict enforcement of the Leveson proposals such as Martin Moore from Media Standards Trust (And Hacked Off), Steven Barnett and Natalie Fenton sat alongside critics such as Tim Luckhurst (Kent Uni) and George Brock (City Uni – ex Times) and myself. Regardless of the arguments we have in the UK about this – or perhaps because of them – the delegation seemed confused on the details. Luckily there were lots of experts on hand with lots of facts, albeit with differing interpretations of those facts.

Wednesday, 8 January 2014

Where are the deadliest places for journalists?



Where are the deadliest places for journalists?

At least 70 journalists were killed around the world in 2013, according to the Committee to Protect Journalists (CPJ), with Syria proving the deadliest.

The annual report states that "Syria remained the most deadly place for journalists on the job in 2013, while Iraq and Egypt each saw a spike in fatal violence". In total, the Middle East accounted for two thirds of journalist deaths with a motive confirmed, last year. The deaths of another 25 journalists in 2013 are also being investigated by the CPJ to determine whether or not they were work-related.

http://www.theguardian.com/news/datablog/2014/jan/07/where-deadliest-most-dangerous-place-journalists-syria

Collaboration, not competition, is the future of journalism



Collaboration, not competition, is the future of journalism

Sending a reporter to a crowded press conference used to make sense. Elbowing aside rivals to publish the story first was expected. Beating the competition–even by one minute—mattered. That all went away with Twitter because no one beats Twitter at breaking news.

But journalists can do something that Twitter can't: in-depth, transformational investigations such as the expos√© on the dangers of acetaminophen by ProPublica and "This American Life." These types of stories don't happen through competition. They happen through collaboration.

http://www.knightfoundation.org/blogs/knightblog/2014/1/7/collaboration-not-competition-future-journalism/

Vice News wants to take documentary-style storytelling to hot spots around the globe



Vice News wants to take documentary-style storytelling to hot spots around the globe

If there's a mantra for the team behind Vice News, it might be: Go where the story takes you. The soon-to-launch news channel from Vice is designed for the type of journalist who wants to strap a camera to her back and jump head first into a conflict zone. That's already taken Vice reporters to places like Sudan, Syria, and the Central African Republic, to report on violence inside the country's borders. When Vice News goes live this month, look for a lot more of that.

http://www.niemanlab.org/2014/01/vice-news-wants-to-take-documentary-style-storytelling-to-hot-spots-around-the-globe/

Tuesday, 7 January 2014

Expectations for digital journalists



Expectations for digital journalists.

For all the gloom and doom you hear about the future of the news business, new opportunities seem to pop up all the time. Take the job Holly Edgell has at WCPO, the Scripps-owned television station in Cincinnati, Ohio. She's the "community editor" for WCPO-Digital, a new position that puts her in charge of social media strategy and hyper-local digital news. She's also been charged with fostering the integration of web and TV content.

10 Jobs That Are Actually Worse Than Being A Journalist



10 Jobs That Are Actually Worse Than Being A Journalist

Journalism is a regular on all the worst job lists. Sure, the pay is shitty, the hours are bad and the perks are pretty much non-existent (unless you consider free notebooks a perk). Despite all that, there's no way journalism, the Fourth Estate, is the worst job ever. We found 10 jobs that will make you thankful that you're an overworked, underpaid journo.

http://www.newscastic.com/news/10-jobs-that-are-actually-worse-than-being-a-journalist-1300020/

Sunday, 5 January 2014

Mobile Journalism



Mobile Journalism

This is a collection of mobile resources from Mike Reilley and the Poynter Institute's Regina McCombs, Dave Stanton and Damon Kiesow, as well as many others. A list of mobile reporting tools appears at the end of this page. Most apps are tailored to the iPhone but have versions available for many other smart phones, too.

http://www.journaliststoolbox.org/archive/2014/01/mobile-journalism.html

Book Review: Understanding Journalism



Book Review: Understanding Journalism

It has become a ubiquitous, almost obsessive, cliché: that journalism is dying and that the Internet is to blame for its terminal state. Newspaper sales are constantly in decline, newsrooms are shrinking, and in just the United States there are below 40,000 full-time media professional employees; the lowest level since 1978. Blogs proliferate, readers flock to free content, almost everybody can now be called a journalist, and in general media seems in total disarray. Sounds familiar, right?

Saturday, 4 January 2014

Six things all journalists need to know about the Defamation Act 2013 (which is now in force)



Six things all journalists need to know about the Defamation Act 2013 (which is now in force)

The Defamation Act 2013 is now in force and creates big changes to the legal climate for all journalists working in England and Wales.

Thankfully nearly all these changes are for the better. It is harder now for companies and individuals to sue for libel, privelege has been extended to include scientific papers and conferences and publications are largely immune from being sued over comments (provided they are responsible in the way they operate their commenting system.

http://www.pressgazette.co.uk/content/six-things-all-journalists-need-know-about-defamation-act-2013-which-now-force

Wednesday, 1 January 2014

2013: A year in Twitter journalism



2013: A year in Twitter journalism

From Edward Snowden's big reveal to the Boston bombings, social media has become an established part of how news spreads and increasingly how it is sourced. In Twitter's S-1 filing prior to its IPO, the company listed a risk factor that "influential users, such as world leaders, government officials, celebrities, athletes, journalists, sports teams, media outlets and brands or certain age demographics conclude that an alternative product or service is more relevant" (emphasis added). We've seen no sign of that happening.

Journalism Is Difficult Task In Pakistan And Women Journalist



Journalism Is Difficult Task In Pakistan And Women Journalist

In Pakistan journalism is a difficult task. The journalists have to tread cautiously and on very delicate grounds. The press laws and Defense of Pakistan rules haunt them at every stepFreedom of the press,one of the four essential freedoms for a nation, is still a mere phrase in Pakistan. Journalists here cannot give free expression to their thoughtsviews and feelings and have to play to the tune of theauthorities. They have often to hide the truth from the public eye and stifle the voice of their conscience. Political condition, unwholesome social atmosphere and unhealthy competition,combined with the backwardness of the country, have made the profession ill paying. It does notattract the best brains-men of light and culture and high education. It is often a resort of the unemployed.